Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

The first I heard of this book was on BBC Radio 2 when Chris Evans DJ mentioned it and I just happened to be in between books so I reserved it at the library using my nifty library app on my phone. Ok so most people will know this is now a movie. I have not seen the movie yet. Anyway my main gripe about this book is that I caught a nano second of a trailer with Ben Afflek as Nick Dunne and unfortunately when I started reading the book  Mr Affleck was Nick Dunne. This was annoying because in the book he is supposed to be blonde!

That aside,. I really enjoyed the book. Its a cracking book is this. With so much insight into , dare I say it, the functioning of a relationship. So There are loads of plot twists in this book and I am not sure how much to say or not to say.

Ok so Nick and Amy are the perfect couple and she is the cool girl to his lazed back guy. She doesn’t like it that he doesn’t remember everything exactly as she wants it to be remembered. This part I could relate to because I remember when I started dating my husband thinking every moment was existential and he couldn’t even recall what I was wearing or where we had gone! Anyway things started to get ugly when Amy disappears and Nick being the husband is the prime suspect.  The format is alternating  segments of Nick’s tale and entries from Amy’s diary beginning seven years previous in 2005. There are twists and sudden developments that will have you leaping from your bed; the twists are good and well handled.

Flynn succeeds in painting the picture of the breakdown of a relationship. Its such a brilliant read because its not so far fetched. not sure I like the ending though!

Makes me want to read:

Heads Off (A Lisa Becker Mystery Book 1) by Falko Rademacher

 

Rated 7

Advertisements

Thank You Jeeves by P. G. Wodehouse

Another witty funny read from the posh world created by Wodehouse giving a window into the absurdities and idiosyncrasies of the upper class in England via the modicum of the hapless Bertie Wooster and his butler Jeeves.

In this caper Jeeves feels that he has no other choice that to leave the employ of his master because of Bertie’s sudden enchantment with a banjolele (i imagine its a cross between a banjo and a ukelele). Needless to say hilarity ensues when Bertie is without his somber man who had a knack for keeping him out of trouble.

Would I read it again? I douhbt it but i did enjoy it much like one enjoys an afternoon romp 😉

Rated 6

Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Powerful. That is the only word I can think of to describe this tome. I havent slept without thinking of this book since i finished reading it a few days ago. This book is a paradigm shifting book. My ideas of Nigeria, Africa, war and peace and colonialism were challenged and ultimately I feel like I have a lot of reading to do. I LOVE LOVE Chimamanda’s style of writing. Will be added to my personal library of African literature.

Rated 9

Makes me want to read:
Harvest of Thorns by Shimmer Chinodya

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

I first read of this book in the Guardian newspaper in an article about books nominated fora new book award ( cant remember the name of the award) . Anyway I reserved a book at the library and when I got it…WOW! I could not put this book down. SO incredibly well written with characters so real you feel for them. The best thing about this book has to the new world that Chimamanda opens up. I felt transported to all the places she wrote of to the lives lived by Ifem and Obinze. Their young love so powerful and authentic. Its tragic in turns but there is always a comedic observations written in a stylish prose. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and will be recommending it highly. I read it a solid 2 days.

It makes me want to read Chimamanda’s other works as well as some of the book that one of the books character’s referes to.

Rated 9

The Adventures of Sally by P G Woodhouse

Picked on a whim without ever having read Woodhouse at all. This book was a long read but this was absolutely lovely.The story was set in 1920s America and England. The characters were well developed, I especially loved the hapless Lancelot ‘Ginger’ Kemp. Woodhouse excelled at giving insight (for me at least) into the mind of the upperclass Englishman via the loathful Bruce Carmyle. My only gripe is the seemingly hurried way in which he was dispatched. One would have thought that after having chased Sally all the way to America (again) that he would have at least tried harder to understand what happened.

It makes me want to read more Woodhouse stuff and I shall certainly do so.

Highly rated although the ending seemed rushed

Rated 7